Your Search Results

PM’s visit and the aftermath

Comments Off

By K.N. Pandita

Prime Minister’s 7 June visit to Srinagar was marked by total strike in the valley. It is more or less identical response of the separatist leadership to his previous visits. In the idiom of the managers of strike this is non-violent protest against Indian presence in Kashmir.

After patronizing gun wielders and their brutalities for two long decades, separatists-secessionists have shifted to what they call “non violent” tactics.  Have they compulsions? Yes, it is not only that Kashmir militancy has run out of steam, but more importantly the people are fed up with violence. They want to return to normal life; they want peace.  Continue Reading…

Kashmir Talks, A labyrinth of intricacies

Comments Off

By Kashinath Pandit,

Inconsistency:

 “I would like to appeal to all the groups outside the political mainstream that our government is ready for dialogue if they shed violence,” the prime minister said at a press conference in New Delhi on 24 May 2010 to mark the first year of his United Progressive Alliance government. Two weeks later he was scheduled to be on an official visit to Kashmir. 

The appeal come barely two days after the APHC (M) faction had urged the prime minister to announce renewed meaningful talks with the Hurriyat (and Pakistan) during his forthcoming visit to the state.  Continue Reading…

PM’s visit, bandh and cash doles

Comments Off

By K.N. Pandita

Prime Minister’s two-day visit to the valley was marked by total bandh observed by valley dwellers on the call of hard-line separatist leader, Sayyid Ali Shah Geelani. During his previous visit also strike had been observed in the valley.
 
No official comment is forthcoming on this situation. Either the Prime Minister is kept totally uniformed or the public reaction is taken for granted as part of Kashmir politics. But it discredits Indian presence in the valley and international observers could raise an eyebrow. Continue Reading…

ICG’s briefing on Kashmir

Comments Off

By K.N. Pandita

Resuming its briefing on Kashmir on 3 June 2010 after a gap of four years, Brussels-based International Crisis Group (ICG) has once again very faithfully adhered to western policy of forcing parity between the roles of India and Pakistan in their respective parts of Kashmir. When it comes to dealing with third world countries, the west deliberately closes the eyes to see no difference between a military controlled religion-centric state and a liberal secular democratic country.

This briefing is marked by many unjustifiable statements and comments that reveal ICG advertently mixing up issues: it is like telling a story by piecing together odds and ends only to make it less cohesive and more controversial.  Continue Reading…