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Kashmir politics: Team Interlocutors

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By K.N. Pandita

That the team does not include a political heavyweight is not of real consequence. A low level, academics-oriented team with a clout somewhere up the official line may have been decided upon to encourage all shades of opinion makers in Kashmir to articulate their grievances freely.

Don’t forget that the US is keeping a close watch on what is happening in this disputed Himalayan region. Also don’t forget that President Obama is visiting this country in November. Of course, he will want to know the latest on Kashmir issue. By and large, low-key diplomacy is Washington’s success story in the context of many global issues. They believe it may not be elusive in the case of Kashmir.  Continue Reading…

Unique role awaits Deobandi ulema

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By K.N. Pandita

Though belated, the recent resolution of the Deobandi ulema of Jam’iatu’l-ulema-e Hind sending a message to Kashmiri Muslims is a wise step likely to help de-escalation of tense situation in the valley.

Extremists may not be very happy with the resolution; some call it capitulation to government’s muscle power. In the valley as well some small sections have not taken it in right spirit. In a situation surcharged with emotions like alienation, apathy and hatred, eyesight gets blurred and vision obscured.  Continue Reading…

Letter to the Editor – Kashmir prescription

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The Times of India, New Delhi

Sir,
Apropos ‘Starting Point of Dialogue’ (ToI, Oct. 13) Kashmir situation has changed drastically from what it was in 1960s to 1990s. We need to talk of present day. Logic of social dynamics does not accept the idea of creating a new segment of the valley youth as one more dissenting front. They are the creation of six decades of hate-India campaign and should not be categorized apart. The writer does no justice either to himself or the volatile youth of Kashmir valley by circumventing the core issue viz. secession from India and accession to Pakistan. The story of autonomy, regional and sub-regional etc. is redundant, and should be forgotten if we mean to be realists. Where will the four hundred thousand extirpated and exiled minority community fit in in the scheme of autonomy or autnomies? Will they have their physical sub-region in the valley and constitutional safeguards to their identity, or does the author write them off once for all as non entity?
K.N. Pandit, Jammu, by email.